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Support Protips

Project boards make it easier to manage your tasks on GitHub. Learn best practices for using project boards to coordinate work with your team and keep track of your personal to-do list.

 

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It's not possible for more than one repository in the same network—like a fork and its parent or two forks of the same repository—to be owned by the same account. Discover the best alternative workflow for your situation.

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Each commit on GitHub is associated with three people: its author, its committer, and its pusher. Learn how these roles are different and what to do if any one of them looks wrong.

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Are you a new GitHub user looking to get started with GitHub Desktop? Here are some common questions you can read through to make sure you get the most out of using GitHub Desktop.

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GitHub recommends using only one user account to manage both personal and professional repositories. Here are some tips for making the most of this arrangement.

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Whether you're just getting started on GitHub or you're already a prominent open source contributor, you should take steps to ensure your account is protected against unauthorized access. 

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Pull requests are the best way to suggest changes to a repository. These best practices from the Support Team will help authors and maintainers create, review, merge, and manage pull requests easily and effectively.

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In part three of this series, we walked through setting up your GitHub Pages site locally with Jekyll. If you've followed along this far: congrats! You now have a themed and fully-functioning GitHub Pages site and the ability to work on it locally. Great! Let's use our new found ability to work locally and customize our Pages site a bit.

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GitHub is most powerful when you use it to collaborate with others. We'll send you notifications to make this collaboration easier, keeping you updated on activities and conversations that involve or interest you. Read some tips for making your notifications as helpful as possible.

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Each year, millions of people make resolutions to improve their lives. Maybe you were one of them. Maybe you decided you wanted to use Git and GitHub for your New Year's resolution. Well, if like me, you have been slacking on getting started on your resolution, this article is going to be perfect.

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In part three of the Getting Started with GitHub Pages mini-series, we walk you through cloning your GitHub Pages site to your computer and using the GitHub Pages gem to build and test your site locally.

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Part 2 of the Getting Started with GitHub Pages mini-series walks you through adding one of GitHub's offical themes to the GitHub Pages site we began working on in the last part of this series. If you haven't yet completed the steps in the previous guide, you'll want to do that before we begin.

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Check out this article for an overview of both forking and cloning, so you can choose the best method for working with your repositories on GitHub.

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As a newcomer to Open Source projects or GitHub repositories, the term fork might seem very foreign to you. Last time you checked, you were trying to contribute to a project, not pick an eating utensil.

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GitHub Pages is GitHub's static site publishing platform. In addition to supporting regular HTML content, GitHub Pages is deeply integrated with Jekyll, a popular static site generator designed for blogging and software documentation. And that's not all! GitHub Pages sites are used for everything from blogs to full blown sites.

We're going to talk about more complex GitHub Pages sites as we work through this series. For right now, we're going to work through the simplest way to use GitHub Pages: publishing a single Markdown file.

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It can be frustrating to realize that hours of hard work are missing from your contributions graph and difficult to determine why. This article contains a few questions to ask yourself to ensure that all your commits are in your graph.

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