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Copilot Lvl 2
Message 1 of 13

Tag without release

For our projects, we are using tags which seem to create releases associated with every tag. Is there a way to stop creation of releases with each tag?


I understand releases at the core are based on tags.

 

Related discussion: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/28496319/github-a-tag-but-not-a-release

> As of 2017-05-31, Github support has stated it's "not currently possible as all tags will appear in [the release] list" - they said they'd pass it along as a feature request, though.

12 Replies
Copilot Lvl 2
Message 2 of 13

Re: Tag without release

Seconded.  In our community a "Release" is a very specific thing and having tab called "Releases" with a bunch of tar files for every tag is confusing.

Community Manager
Message 3 of 13

Re: Tag without release

Hi @sarats and @rljacob,

 

Thanks for this feedback! We're always working to improve GitHub and the GitHub Community Forum, and we consider every suggestion we receive.

 

As that StackOverflow answer relates, each tag creates a release point but does not actually create a release. Releases themselves are created when you add release notes to a tag. However, as you noted, tags that don't have a release associated with them do still show up on the releases tab, albeit in a very different style. I can see how this could be confusing.

 

I've logged your feature request in our internal feature request list. Though I can't guarantee anything or share a timeline for this, I can tell you that it's been shared with the appropriate teams for consideration.

 

Please let me know if you have any other questions.

 

Thanks!

Copilot Lvl 2
Message 4 of 13

Re: Tag without release

Thanks.

 

If you haven't made a release yet, but have made tags, the release tab will be nothing but "release points" which all have the same look.  This is also confusing.

Ground Controller Lvl 2
Message 5 of 13

Re: Tag without release

There are already 2 UI tabs: "Releases" and "Tags" 

However they both show the same content: All Tags (plus some releases information)

It would be interesting to have in the "Releases" tab only the actual releases, that contains other binaries or notes.

 

 

 

Community Manager
Message 6 of 13

Re: Tag without release

Hi @racer1988,

We appreciate the feedback. I'll pass it along to the appropriate teams!

 

Thanks!

Copilot Lvl 2
Message 7 of 13

Re: Tag without release

WHy can we even add tags without release or branches? When i add a tag using sourcetree the tag shows in the branch menu, yet i get a 404 when clicking one

Community Manager
Message 8 of 13

Re: Tag without release

Hi @schroef,

 

Is the repository that you're having problems with a public one? You should still be able to view a tagged commit unless that commit is no longer reachable in the history and has since been purged.

 

Thanks!

Copilot Lvl 2
Message 9 of 13

Re: Tag without release

I do see the tags, im using "keep a change log" method for easy workflow. In their example, each update start with a version, which is same as the tag.. When you check this link, you see that the release version link to there comparison page automatically.

 

My guess this only works if you're using branches and do pulls per released tag. I dont do that and simply work on one main branch.

Community Manager
Message 10 of 13

Re: Tag without release

WHy can we even add tags without release or branches? When i add a tag using sourcetree the tag shows in the branch menu, yet i get a 404 when clicking one

 

Because tags are different from branches, despite how Sourcetree displays them. A branch is a name for some unit of work that can grow and change over time, with commits added, subtracted, or changed. A tag is a name for a specific commit, a specific point in the repository's history. While you can delete and recreate a tag, it is not typically done. A tag is intended to be fixed.

 

The "keep a change log" method doesn't require any particular branching or tag structure. You could just point directly to commits using their SHA if you wanted and the change log format described at https://keepachangelog.com/ would still work. It is easier to use tags though because v1.0.0 is generally easier to type and remember than d20c188ff2c6353de3d8682ca94100d452c65479, even though they will both take you to the same point in history in the keepachangelog project because they are two different names for the same commit. And even if you do decide to use tags, you still don't have to use branches or pull requests if you don't want to. These are all optional features that are designed to make specific development or source control activities easier or more accessible.

 

If you want to understand more about how Git works and how commits, branches, and tags all work and interrelate, I strongly recommend reading Git from the Bottom Up by jwiegley.

 

I hope that helps!